July 13, 2015

Monday Made It: Another kind of TPT

At the beginning of summer I mentioned that I was reading several professional development books, among them Total Participation Techniques (TPT, for short) by Persidea and William Himmele.


One of my BBB's, Lisa from Mrs. Spangler in the Middle, wrote to me and said that she was VERY interested in hearing more about this book and its contents. Lisa inspired me to do this book talk. Thanks for the great idea, Lisa!

About this book...
Providing easy-to-use alternatives to the stand and deliver approach to teaching that causes so many students to tune out--or even drop out--Total Participation Techniques presents dozens of ways to engage K 12 students in active learning and allow them to demonstrate the depth of their knowledge and understanding. The authors, Persida Himmele and William Himmele, explain both the why and the how of Total Participation Techniques (TPTs) as they explore the high cost of student disengagement, place TPTs in the context of higher-order thinking and formative assessments, and demonstrate how to create a TPT-conducive classroom.  
Readers will learn how to implement field-tested techniques they can use on the spot (e.g., Quick-Draws, Quick-Writes, Chalkboard Splash); with Hold-Up cards (e.g., True/Not True, Selected Response); with movement (e.g., Bounce Cards, Line-Ups, Simulations); and to guide note-taking and concept analysis (e.g., Picture Notes, 3-Sentence Wrap-Up, Debate Team Carousel).
Filled with examples from real classrooms, Total Participation Techniques is an essential toolkit for teachers at all levels and for administrators who want a model for analyzing lessons to ensure that they are relevant, engaging, and cognitively challenging... from Amazon.com
As I read through the book, I recognized many things that I already did in my classroom that were TPT's; I just didn't call them that. I've been using exit tickets and quick writes for some time, as well as Pair-Share or Turn and Teach; Thumbs-up, Thumbs-down; and using sign language to indicate multiple choice answers.

What I like about the book is that there is a plethora of activities, MANY more than what I was already familiar with, described IN DETAIL...

Each TPT is presented in four parts:* A descriptive overview * How It Works--step-by-step instructions for implementation* How to Ensure Higher-Order Thinking--ideas for advancing students beyond surface-level thinking* Pause to Apply--suggestions for how to adapt and personalize the technique for specific contexts and content areas... from Amazon.com
Have any of you read this book? I'd love to hear your thoughts about the techniques presented. Has anyone implemented the techniques?


This now brings me to...

As I read through all the techniques, I decided to implement a few in my instruction this coming year. I have to select just a FEW to not overwhelm myself. Too many and I will forget what is what! Total Participation Cards referred to as HOLD-UPS (there's a HUGE variety mentioned in the book) are something so close to what I'm doing already that I knew I could implement them well. I made two sets: Mastery Cards and Choice Cards.

Mastery Cards are meant to be used by students while they are working. Students select the level of understanding where they are during discussions and work sessions to inform the teacher who then can concentrate on those who are "still working at it." Simple to make and use, you can grab your forever freebie set HERE.



Choice Cards are designed to engage EVERY student in a discussion or question/answer session. You can grab your set (including four options) of this forever freebie HERE.


Be sure you stop by 4th Grade Frolics to check out OODLES of Monday Made Its. Betcha find something there you just can't resist making!




13 comments:

  1. My district offered a book study last year on TPT, and we all LOVED it. As you stated, some of the things I already did in my classroom. However, there were so many more participation activities that were clearly described in the book that I had not done. Both the children and I loved the activities. I teach 5th grade math to 3 sections of students, and the activities really kept the students engaged and on task. I too made the cards that were recommended and placed them in a pocket on each students desk (to keep them handy and ready to use at a moments notice). I highly recommend reading this book.

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    1. I was going to suggest to my admin. that this would be a good book to use as a staff study. I'm glad to hear that the activities were successful with your students. I'm looking forward to implementing them. I like how you were able to have them keep the cards so handy. We don't have desks in my room, just group tables. I'm thinking of keeping them in baskets, one per table, that I can hand out as needed. Still working on the routine.

      Thanks for stopping by!
      Angela

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  2. That book sounds awesome. I'm heading over to Amazon to order it. Thanks so much for sharing this and the freebies!
    Janie
    Are We There Yet?

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    1. I'd love to hear your thoughts about the book, Janie! Come back and share or better yet, blog or periscope about it!

      Angela

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  3. Wow! This is great. Our school is big into total engagement. We just had Kagan training this year and have looked at Whole Brain class techniques. Thanks for making these cuties to ensure engagement! I will have to look into this book.

    My Bright Blue House

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    1. You are MOST welcome! I hope you find some use for them. I read Whole Brain Teaching last year and have begun implementing many of those techniques as well. TPT and WBT work well together.

      Angela

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  4. I have never heard of this book until today. It looks like a great read. I love the classroom participation cards that you have created. What great tools! I will have to add this book to my summer reading list. Thank you for sharing!

    Jennifer
    Elementary School Garden

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    1. Thanks for your kind words about the cards. Maybe you'll be able to use them in your class. Once you read the book, I'd like to hear what you think about it. This might be a good book to do a shared read among bloggers. Hmmm?

      Angela

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  5. I've been making a similar set of these, but I really want them to stand up on a desk so students can use them during independent work time (I plan to add a few of my own cards for this). I might have to go to Kinkos to get it done!

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  6. That seems like an interesting book!

    Love the choice cards, I want to do something similar too :)

    Anisa @ Creative Undertakings

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    1. Thanks for the kind words about the cards! The book is WELL WORTH the read! So many great ideas are provided in it. I purchased the Kindle version so I wouldn't have to worry about carrying a book around with me. I can access it via my phone wherever I am!

      Angela

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  7. This book sounds great, I have added it to my wishlist to purchase in the future. I do believe I already do a few TPT's in my room, but I'd like to refine them and make better use of them on a consistent basis!

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  8. Great idea. I love having students show me where they are at. I often have students hold up 1-4 fingers before, during, or at the end of a lesson to show their level of understanding. 1 = I don't understand, 2 = I can understand with help, 3 = I understand it, 4 = I can teach it to someone. I love the idea of having them be able to show be where they are at while they are working too. Thanks for sharing :)

    @ Wiley Teaching

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